Height-adjustable sliding CT

The CT is built onto two unique mobile platforms that allow the scanner to move over the patient and be adjusted to the patients’ height. It enables imaging of the head, neck and extremities of a standing equine without having to move the patient. 

 

 

Two installation options:

1. Standard installation - CT system is positioned at ground level
(patient stands on the same level as CT), allowing to scan:


  • Head and neck CT in a standing horse
  • Other regions and animals under general anesthesia (GA)



2. Low-bed installation – the CT system is installed in a pit 

(patient stands on the ground level and the CT can be moved below the patient), 
allowing to scan:


  • Head and neck CT in a standing horse
  • Distal limb CT in the standing horse
  • Other regions and animals under GA

Different CT systems can be used:

Depending on the focus of the clinic either on equine dentistry, equine orthopedics or  small animal medicine you can choose between CT systems with 16 to 320 detector rows and 32 to 640 slices. 

 

 

CT system is moved down in the pit for examining the distal extremity of standing horses or any other anatomical regions under general anesthesia.
CT system is moved down in the pit for examining the distal extremity of standing horses or any other anatomical regions under general anesthesia.

 Adaptions of the system to equine medicine

 

Gantry 180° rotated

Brings the FOV closer to the horse for both, GA and standing CT examinations

 

Modified Front Cover


for lower neck imaging and a greater stability of the gantry

 

Patient rest

An external head rest can be omitted. The original patient couch was modified and can be used to position the anatomical structure to be examined during standing and GA examinations. 

The patient couch is adapted to the gantry’s shape, maximizing the space within the gantry.

Furthermore it allows high-adjustment of the limb for a non-weight-bearing examination of the standing horse (arthrography). 

 

Gantry

The gantry is rotated by 180° compared to its original position, whereby the eccentrically placed field-of-view is closest to the patient.

The lower part of the front cover was replaced by a metal construct. It does significantly improve the stability of the gantry and brings the central beam up to 11 cm closer to the lower neck region of the standing horse.